Review of the book After

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http://www.blurb.com/b/1986861-after

I have recently obtained a review of my book After by Marta Pombo Salles.

As a reader I truly enjoyed the book After by Mario Savioni, which I would define mainly as a strong claim against human injustice. This wonderful collection of poems reveals the author’s main concern about unfairness in the world. Some poems are critical of the capitalist system: ‘I look to our leaders and I see that/There’s money in stealing/In lying, in raping/Out of some fear that there would not be enough.’ There is also strong critique of America’s imperialism that leads to endless wars such as the conflicts in Afghanistan and Palestine, and greed for oil in the Middle East.

“America’s discovery and foundation appears to be the result of ‘The disease of man,’ ‘Killing the Indians/Building ugly towns.’ Yet the author sees hope in America’s initial good moral principles that have been perverted since the beginning. In general, he sees hope in our world even though life is hard for those who suffer. In this group of people the figure of the artist/writer, a truth and beauty seeker, appears as someone not being valued in a too materialistic society, not making enough money to live and by his dreams: ‘I think as artists, we dream and never wake./The blue sky is the work of our pens/And inks that cast a failed light.’ Under these circumstances love becomes very difficult. You can love a woman but you fear financial problems that won’t make the relationship last. Some of the poems deal with the impossibility to fulfill love and to attain a lasting relationship. Moreover, the artist/writer sees himself as part of the collective psyche co-responsible for allowing human injustice.”

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5 comments

  1. I was rereading After and had a closer look at poem The Sea is Watching. I like it very much as a poem having found inspiration in the Japanese movie with the same title: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0316829/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

    The whole poem sounds very musical when I read the words from the book and, at the same time, listen to you, as its author, reading it on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-BEgmRZw1s

    This is how I interpreted the poem at first sight:
    The “complacent nest” could be a euphemism for the word brothel.
    The “field of innocence” is something I associate with Oshin. She is an innocent prostitute because she still believes in love although she is a sex worker. She falls in love twice. She weeps because the promise of marriage with Fusanosuke has not been fulfilled. She is not “a party to purity.”
    There seems to be a he, not wanting tea and walking along the edge, either Fusanosuke or maybe it is the second chance she gets when she falls in love again with Ryosuke. The word “edge” suggests risk.
    Could they be the “young lovers”? There is death, someone younger dying that could refer to Ryosuke killing Kikuno’s customer.
    The coming of spring suggests the lovers’ season par excellence. The beginning of love. Summer would mean this love is already ripe, like fruit.
    I also see the traditional men-women roles. “The weakness of men” who are supposed to be so strong but they are weak with the pleasures of the flesh as they need prostitutes and sex, often abusing women. Luckily the rain and the storm seem to come as an opportunity for purity, for the prostitutes to clean themselves and to get rid of this life. The “lucky red silk” appears to me as the symbol for the brothel, now a “floating debris”.
    The two women sit and wait on the rooftop, a symbol for an anchor where they can hold on to. “The shooting star” means hope, a wish that someone will come and rescue them from the flood, maybe the second he, Oshin’s second opportunity in life, that is, Ryosuke coming by boat.

  2. I am a high school German and English teacher from Barcelona who happened to meet Mario Savioni at a poetry reading in London last summer. We became friends and I started to read one of his books, Blue Emptiness, out of curiosity. I liked it so much that I reviewed it. He was so satisfied with it that I wanted to continue reading his poetry books and ended up writing a review for each one. I really love all his books. You can find my reviews here:

    Blue Emptiness:

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/mario-savioni/blue-emptiness/paperback/product-21035691.html

    This Way To The End:

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/mario-savioni/this-way-to-the-end/ebook/product-22310998.html

    A Man Looking At Women:

    http://www.blurb.com/b/2133990-a-man-looking-at-women#book_comments

    Uncertainty:

    http://www.blurb.com/b/2134039-uncertainty#book_comments

  3. I am a high school German and English teacher from Barcelona who happened to meet Mario Savioni at a poetry reading in London last summer. We became friends and I started to read one of his books, Blue Emptiness, out of curiosity. I liked it so much that I reviewed it. He was so satisfied with it that I wanted to continue reading his poetry books and ended up writing a review for each one. I really love all his books. You can find my reviews here:

    Blue Emptiness:

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/mario-savioni/blue-emptiness/paperback/product-21035691.html

    This Way To The End:

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/mario-savioni/this-way-to-the-end/ebook/product-22310998.html

    A Man Looking At Women:

    http://www.blurb.com/b/2133990-a-man-looking-at-women#book_comments

    Uncertainty:

    http://www.blurb.com/b/2134039-uncertainty#book_comments

    • Thank you very much for your time and clarity. I love that someone other than myself has articulated what might be contained in my books. As you know, we have impressions of our work and we might even be inclined to explain them to someone else as they came to us and what inspired each piece, but it is better if someone else with a distance from them provides a second opinion.


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